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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> the word shouldn't change from the original constitution, surely. >> my words aren't based on the constitution. >> i get that, but what it is is about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie. daniel day-lewis was great as lincoln. it was all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery abolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was acceptable who were outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular for the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> but we -- >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says that every man should be free. >> right, but you don't think every man should be free and equal. >> no -- of course we're free. and of course we're equal. >> what does that mean? >> you can love anybody you want to. >> but you don't think a gay man or woman should
to also teach our students, the workforce, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an opt
at the urban institute, and alisha coleman- jensen jensen, a social science fellow at the usda. i want to show this map, which might surprise people. virginia, maryland, pennsylvania, new york, they have less food insecurity. in the deep south, states like georgia, alabama, mississippi, texas and in california, there is more food insecurity. why? guest: there is regional variation, ranging from a low of 8% to a high of 19%. research has shown there are factors for households within the state, and also factors like economic conditions at the state level and state policies that affect food insecurity. the poverty rate in the unemployment rate varies across states, the level of education berries and other factors such as region varies, and other factors such as participation in food programs varies. the cost of housing, the average wages -- all of these factors affect food insecurity. host: susan, dayton, ohio. good morning. caller: i really admire the program and an emphasis on nutritious food, and i was wondering if there were any thoughts going toward that same thing with the snap program. gue
inequality so much, whether it's gender issues or gay rights or whatever. even in the medical sciences there is discrimination. so it turns out that more women die of heart disease now than all cancers combined. more women die of heart disease rather than men, more women than men die of heart disease. did you know that? i was so shocked by some of these statistics. >> until i researched this interview and i saw why you were so strong about it. >> right. >> it's startling. >> 50 years of research have been done on men. i'll tell you a funny story, too. you realize how powerful females are, okay? that even in the research, a woman doctor discovered how to grow a heart from stem cells in, you know, in a petri dish, whatever. how did she do it? you know how she did it? with only female stem cells because literally the male stem cells got lost. like in life. and they refused to ask for directions. now, this is true. can you imagine that? so i just believe, you know, breast cancer has done such a magnificent job raising millions and millions of dollars to help that disease, but let's say 39,
his nose so bright? well, science has an answer. it's red all right. we will share it with you ahead. ♪ rudolph the red nosed reindeer. you'll go down in history. ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great sinesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're
, cruise ship on its side in the water. well, now think about the advances made in science. some of them dazzle the eye. john zarrella counts down the top ten. >> reporter: at number ten a revolutionary camera called litro. >> it is such a powerful technology breakthrough that this will forever change how we all take inexperienced pictures. >> reporter: the camera captures the entire light field allowing the picture's focus and perspective to be changed after it's been taken. number nine, nasa's dawn spacecraft sent back staggering data about an asteroid 325 miles in diameter called vesta. it appears vesta went through some stages of planetary evolution. it's one of a kind in the solar system. >> what's clear to us is that vesta appears to be the only intact proto planet that's left. >> reporter: number eight. you may have heard the term god particle. scientists call it higsbosin. the european nuclear research corporation claims to have found it. why is it a big deal? think big bang theory. >> and this particle we think was in fact a particle like this was the fuse that set off the explo
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
. we look at the major advances in science and technology. "newsroom" starts now. good morning. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello wishing you and yours a very merry christmas. we begin this hour with pope benedict using his annual christmas message to speak about the hope for peace even in the most difficult times and situations. just hours ago the 85-year-old pope spoke before a crowd in st. peter's square and to millions of others watching around the world he says even in syria, a nation embroiled in a nearly two-year long civil war, peace is possible. >> translator: may peace bring for the people of syria, deeply wounded and divided by a conflict which does not spare even the defenseless and reaps innocent victims. once again, i appeal for an end to the bloodshed. easier access for the relief of refugees and the displaced and dialogue in the pursuit of a political solution to the conflict. >> the pope also spoke out against violence against christians in nigeria and wrapped up his address by delivering christmas greetings in 65 languages. >>> in bethlehem peop
wily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> less than a week before we go flying over the fiscal cliff, there is still no deal in sight. hampton pearson in washington with the very latest on that. what do you have? >> how you doing? we are down to single digits, seven days and counting if you will, to even get a short-term fiscal cliff deal done. we heard president obama on friday handed what we might call a bare bones plan c ahead of january first. extension of the bush tax cuts for those making $250,000 or less and an extension of unemployment benefits. while it could be a quick turn-around from that hawaiian vacation for president obama and congressional leaders, expectations they could be back in washington later this week, all eyes now on the senate where republicans are split on whether it's possible to make a deal with the obama white house. >> the president's statement is right. no one wants taxes to go up on the middle class. i don't want them to go up on anybody. i'm not in the ma
got his ba in political science from the university of florida and m.a. and phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> the automobile industry. last night and he was stopping production of vx. the electors frequently, as solid and no satisfactory radio and television shows onto human kind. even norm has competed for the misquotations in any given year and multimedia. norm is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute for public policy research. he writes a column for roll call. he's written for every publication on the face of the earth. he and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, and "nightline" charlie rose. he has another heart and are coming ba, magna laude from university of minnesota and a phd from university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think tom and warm is so much attention the outlook piece is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that would make it not, there really must be something wron
chair, had a governmental studies program, got his ba in political science from university of florida in this animated phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> any cd automobile industry. [laughter] >> and was opposed by stopping production of the units sold. the electors are solid in all and is on every show known to humankind. they've often competed for the most quotations in any given year than all of our media. norm is a resident scholar at the representative for public policy research. the election analyst for cbs and has written for every publication on the face of the earth dirty and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, "nightline," charlie rose. he has another heartland are, ba university of minnesota phd from the university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think that tom and norm for so much attention is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that when they get mad, they really must be something wrong. so wh
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we've talked a lot about the gun culture in this country since sandy hook and up until now we haven't come to any conclusions about how to stop gun violence in america. not hard to understand, we live in two americas, one that believes owning a gun is a god-given right and one that believes owning a gun comes with a price, sometimes a tragic price. few years ago i sat down with two men who represent those two americas, one in baltimore, maryland, and the other at rural western pennsylvania. donte barksdale runs on faith. >> i'm going to take a little walk. >> reporter: an ex-con, long fought to end gun violence. according to the brady campaign to prevent gun violence there were more than 97,000 people shot in america this year, more than 250 each day. we like our guns in america. we love our guns in america. don't we? >> in the urban parts of the city, you know they tell us the biggest guy, the guy who has the most people are afraid of, the guy with the biggest gun, this is what a man is. safe streets. we're all we got. >> r
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
it will save you money, as well. >>> later on, what do you get when santa claus meets a science fiction fantasy? stay tuned for our "world news now" christmas tradition called "st. nick and the space nicks." i've never seen this. i'm very excited. >> you have your mug now and you're going to go through that. so you're officially part of the overnight family. you've been indoctrinated with us now. >> i'm happy to be here. >> merry christmas. always good to have you. but first, it is a white christmas for parts of the country. philadelphia and many cities in the northeast got a few inches of snow, but it won't last long due to a coming meltdown. >> it's part of a system that snarled traffic and delayed airline passengers. as abc's alex perez reports. >> reporter: blankets of snow from central new york to northern california, creating christmas chaos for some parts of the country. >> we're hoping we don't sit on the runway. we did that the last time. >> reporter: in chicago, paula and her three daughters arrived early for their christmas eve flight. they are among the millions taking to the crowde
in science. it turns out, your dog or your cat may be depressed. and the treatment that works for humans could also work for your pets. it's true. abc's dan harris has the story. >> reporter: of all the absurd things we do for our pets, the massages, the themed birthday parties, the treadmills, the high-end couture. the paris hilton $325,000 doghouse. >> inside is moldings and lighting and heat and air conditioning. >> reporter: of all of the over-the-top pampering, this picture, at first glance at least, struck me as the apex of this particular brand of mania. this doe-eyed little pooch is staring into an artificial sunlight generator, in case he's getting depressed from lack of sun exposure. it's made by a company called pawsitive lighting. then, i heard of the inventor. he was suffering from a severe case of insomniinsomnia. max's doctor told him to use a bright box to counter the gloomy days. it worked. not only on max, but on his golden retriever, luke. >> luke and i were basking in the sun. and he was completely drawn to the light. >> reporter: max did research. and a lot of vets s
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)